MOOD and ADDICTION RECOVERY

BASIS FOR NEUROFEEDBACK WITH DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY



Recent studies using PET scans, SPECT scans and Functional MRIs have shown that depression and anxiety are characterized by abnormal rates of metabolism in specific regions of the brain. These abnormalities correspond with findings on EEG Brain Maps called Quantitative EEG that show imbalances in brain activation. Over 120 scientific studies describe and document the abnormal brain waves in those with depression. Imbalances in activation of specific frequencies in certain areas of the brain are found. Coherence, or the brains ability to share information between areas of the brain, is also unbalanced.

NeuroFeedback Training can address these imbalances


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NEUROFEEDBACK AND ADDICTIONS

Neurofeedback can improve addictions treatment outcomes and lead to better results than the best mainstream approaches now available. The evidence for this is good—and likely will be better when the results of some on-going studies reach peer-reviewed journals. Treatment often begins with a quantitative EEG and is individualized, but in most cases it involves slowing down or speeding up the cortex. One widely used process for slowing is called the “alpha-theta protocol” or the Peniston protocol, after the researcher Eugene Peniston who refined and researched it. The technique actually goes back to the Menninger Clinic and work by Elmer Green, Dale Walters, and Steve Fahrion over thirty years ago.
Research has shown that success in alcohol treatment is worse for those alcoholics who have the least alpha and theta activity, and the most beta. This finding supplements the discovery that alcoholics as a group have less alpha and theta and relatively more beta than non-alcoholics. That is, alcoholics form a continuum, with the most cortically hyper aroused (those with less alpha and theta) showing worse outcomes than others who are less hyper aroused.